Opah

Opah

Opah, © Amadeo Bachar

At a glance

Eco-rating Mercury Omega-3s
+-Opah (US)
OK
Elevated

MORE ABOUT OPAH

Opah caught in California and Hawaii with drift gill nets or pelagic longlines is an “ok” choice because Opah is bycatch in fisheries that target other species. Little is known about this fish but U.S. fleets have greatly reduced bycatch levels due to tougher regulations and gear modifications.

Commercial Sources

The main sources of opah are the United States, New Zealand and French Polynesia. Opah sold in the U.S. market are almost exclusively from Hawaii.

Capture Methods

Since opah do not swim in schools, they cannot be directly targeted for commercial fisheries. They do, however, associate with tuna and billfish and are therefore caught incidentally on longlines for these species.

+-Opah (Imported)
Worst
Elevated

MORE ABOUT OPAH

Opah caught internationally with pelagic longlines is considered a “worst" choice because there's significant bycatch of vulnerable and endangered species, including marine mammals, seabirds, sea turtles, sharks and rays. The measures to monitor and mitigate interactions with vulnerable species are not effective in international longline fisheries.

Commercial Sources

The main sources of opah are the United States, New Zealand and French Polynesia. Opah sold in the U.S. market are almost exclusively from Hawaii.

Capture Methods

Since opah do not swim in schools, they cannot be directly targeted for commercial fisheries. They do, however, associate with tuna and billfish and are therefore caught incidentally on longlines for these species.

Recommended servings per month

Contaminant Men Women Kids 6-12 Kids 0-5
Opah (US) Mercury 1 1 1 < 1
Opah (Imported) Mercury 1 1 1 < 1
Eco details: 

Little is known about the basic biology of opah, making it difficult to determine population health or how effectively they are managed.

These fish are caught exclusively as bycatch in tuna longline fisheries, which kill sea turtles, seabirds and sharks.